HALL OF VERY GOOD COMMITTEE

Begun in 2002, the Hall of Very Good seeks to honor outstanding players and coaches who are not in the Hall of Fame. 

Press Releases:
Class of 2013 - June 2, 2013
2013 Hall of Very Good Finalists - March 20, 2013

Here are all inductees into the Hall of Very Good, listed by Class:

Class of 2013
Erich Barnes
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Chicago Bears (1958–1960), New York Giants (1961–1964), Cleveland Browns (1965–1971)
Bio: Though he never played on a champion, Erich Barnes was no stranger to team success. Eight times during his career, his team finished in first place, and the winning percentage of the teams he played for was a sterling .675. Barnes was named to six Pro Bowls, including four in a row from 1961–64, was a regular on all-conference teams throughout his career, and is one of a handful of players named to the Pro Bowl with three different teams. Barnes intercepted 45 passes in his career, returned seven for touchdowns and led the NFL in interception return yards in 1961 on seven picks that included one of 102 yards. In all, he scored 10 touchdowns, including one in 1961 on one of his two career pass receptions, a 62-yarder from Y.A. Tittle. Barnes was also an ironman, playing in all but two games from 1958–1970. 

Mike Curtis 
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Baltimore Colts (1965–1975), Seattle Seahawks (1976), Washington Redskins (1977–1978)
Bio: When Mike Curtis moved from fullback to linebacker in 1966, he became one of the most feared defensive players of his era, both at outside linebacker and then in the middle. In 1968 he was selected to the first of his four Pro Bowls and earned first-team All-NFL honors as the Colts advanced to the Super Bowl. Curtis was moved to middle linebacker in 1969, where he would also excel, being named first-team all-conference in his first season at the new position. In 1970, Curtis was selected AFC Defensive Player of the Year by one news agency and led the Colts back to the Super Bowl. Against Dallas, he intercepted a pass with a minute left and the score tied to set up the game-winning field goal. Taken in the 1976 expansion draft by Seattle, Curtis was Seattle’s first defensive captain and blocked a field goal to preserve the franchise’s first win. He was second-team all-AFC three times and finished his career with the Redskins.

Roman Gabriel
Position: Quarterback
Teams: Los Angeles Rams (1962–1972), Philadelphia Eagles (1973–1977)
Bio: Though he played well early in his career, it took Roman Gabriel five seasons to establish himself as the Rams’ starting quarterback. The team’s reluctance to make him the full-time starter is baffling considering the Rams went 11-11-1 in games he started from 1962–65 and 4-27-2 otherwise. Gabriel came into his own in 1966 under George Allen as Los Angeles posted its first winning season since 1958. Gabriel made three straight Pro Bowls from 1967–69 as the Rams went 32-7-3 and won two division titles. He capped off the decade by winning the NFL’s MVP Award in 1969. His success continued into the 1970s with the Rams and, after a trade, the Eagles, as he led the league in passing yards and TD passes in 1973, earning the Comeback Player of the Year Award as well as his fourth Pro Bowl bid. Gabriel’s size and strength made him very difficult to sack, and his 3.3 career interception percentage was the best of all time when he retired.

Cookie Gilchrist
Position: Fullback
Teams: Hamilton Tiger-Cats (1956–1957), Saskatchewan Roughriders (1958), Toronto Argonauts (1959–1961), Buffalo Bills (1962–1964), Denver Broncos (1965 and 1967), Miami Dolphins (1966)
Bio: Cookie Gilchrist played six brilliant years in the CFL, where he was as versatile as he was talented, playing fullback, linebacker, placekicker, punter and kick returner. He was runner-up for the CFL’s Most Outstanding Player Award in 1960 and was an all-star selection for five of his six CFL seasons. In his first year with the Bills, Gilchrist became the AFL’s first 1,000-yard rusher and was named league MVP.  Gilchrist set a single-game rushing record in 1963 with 243 yards and five TDs in leading the Bills to their first playoff appearance. He led the AFL in rushing again in 1964 and added 122 yards in the title game victory. After a trade to Denver, he finished second in rushing in the AFL in 1965. Gilchrist led the AFL in rushing TDs four years in a row, including a total of 25 in 1962–63, and he averaged 1,000 yards per season in those four years and was a unanimous all-AFL choice three times and a second-teamer once.

Bob Kuechenberg
Position: Guard/Tackle
Team: Miami Dolphins (1970–1983)
Bio: Bob Kuechenberg is the only player to suit up for all five Miami Dolphins Super Bowl teams. He was a mainstay on the back-to-back world champions of 1972–1973, including the team that went 17-0 in the 1972 season, becoming professional football’s last team with a perfect record and the only team to do so in the Super Bowl era. That year, Kuechenberg and his offensive linemates led the way as running backs Larry Csonka and Mercury Morris both reached the 1,000-yard rushing milestone, the first NFL teammates to do so in the same season. Kuechenberg was very durable during his long career. He played in every game in 12 of his 14 seasons and missed only five games total during his professional career. He was named to the Pro Bowl six times and to a variety of All-Pro and All-AFC teams in a number of seasons. “When I broke in,” Hall of Fame guard Joe DeLamielleure once said, “Kuechenberg was the best in the business and I modeled my play after him.”

Daryle Lamonica
Position: Quarterback
Teams: Buffalo Bills (1963–1966), Oakland Raiders (1967–1974), Southern California Sun (1975)
Bio: After four seasons in Buffalo as Jack Kemp's backup, Daryle Lamonica was traded to Oakland in what is still lamented as the worst trade in Bills history.  Lamonica was only 25 and always seemed to play spectacularly in relief of Kemp.  Many felt Buffalo had traded away its future and, based on his performance with Oakland, those feelings were justified, for as the Bills' fortunes declined, Lamonica and the Raiders flourished. In his very first year in Oakland, Lamonica became the Mad Bomber as he threw for 3,228 yards and 30 touchdowns, led the Raiders to a 13-1 record and a trip to the Super Bowl, and was named the AFL’s MVP.  In his first three seasons with the Raiders, he passed for 9,775 yards and 89 TDs and claimed a second MVP Award in 1969 as Oakland compiled a 37-4-1 record (.902). For his career, his record as a starter was 66-16-4 for an astonishing winning percentage of .784, second best in history behind Otto Graham’s .810.

Lemar Parrish
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Cincinnati Bengals (1970–1977), Washington Redskins (1979–1981), Buffalo Bills (1982)
Bio: Eight-time Pro Bowler Lemar Parrish was one of the standout cornerbacks of the 1970s. He teamed with fellow defensive backs Ken Riley and Tommy Casanova to give the Cincinnati Bengals one of the best secondaries of the decade. He intercepted 47 passes in his professional career, five of which he returned for touchdowns. He also scored eight other touchdowns: five on kick returns and three on fumble recoveries. His pick total included seven interceptions in 1970 and nine in 1979, when he was second in the league. Parrish also played special teams and was a stellar return man, leading the NFL in punt returns in 1974 with an average of 18.8 yards and two touchdowns, including one of 90 yards. In addition to his Pro Bowl honors, he was a regular All-AFC selection while with Cincinnati. After being traded to the Washington Redskins, Parrish was a unanimous All-Pro in 1979 and a consensus choice in 1980. He finished his professional career with Buffalo in 1982.

Donnie Shell
Position: Defensive Back
Team: Pittsburgh Steelers (1974–1987)
Bio: As an undrafted free agent out of South Carolina State, Donnie Shell first made his mark as one of the top special teams players in the league. Earning the nickname the “Human Torpedo,” he gained the respect of his teammates and coaches and was named the first special teams captain in Steelers history in 1976. After becoming a starting safety for Pittsburgh’s famed Steel Curtain defense the following year, Shell was selected to the Pro Bowl five consecutive times (1978–1982), and he was a first-team All-Pro three times, a second teamer twice. Shell was a vicious tackler and excellent in run support, but it's his 51 career interceptions that stand out. When he retired in 1987, he led the league in interceptions from the strong safety position, and only one NFL player had more interceptions in the same period (1974–1987). He was the Steelers MVP in 1980 and was named to both the franchise’s 50th and 75th anniversary all-time teams. In addition, he played on four Steelers Super Bowl–winning teams and was named to the Silver Anniversary Super Bowl team in 1990.

Jim Tyrer
Position: Tackle
Teams: Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs (1961–1973), Washington Redskins (1974)
Bio:
At 6'6" and 280 pounds, Jim Tyrer was the prototype of the huge offensive linemen that dominate the game today. He used his size and strength to great advantage in becoming one of the best offensive tackles of all time. The Texans won the AFL championship in 1962 and again in 1966 and 1969, after the franchise moved to Kansas City. That run culminated with a rousing victory in Super Bowl IV, when Tyrer and his linemates dominated Minnesota’s great defensive front four that included Hall of Famers Alan Page and Carl Eller. Tyrer was selected to play in seven AFL All-Star games as well as the first two Pro Bowls after the 1970 merger. In addition, he was a fixture on All-AFL teams, earning first-team honors eight straight years from 1962–69, and was named to the combined All-AFL/NFL first team in 1969. Tyrer, who died in 1980, was also a unanimous first-team All-Pro in 1970 and 1971 and was named one of the offensive tackles on the AFL’s all-time team.

 

Class of 2012
Bill Bergey
Position: Linebacker
Teams:
Cincinnati Bengals 1969-1973, Philadelphia Eagles 1974-1980
Bio: Bill Bergey started his career in the AFL with the second year Bengals. He made an immediate impact, earning a spot in the AFL All-Star Game as a rookie. He became one of the top middle linebackers in the game during his five seasons in Cincinnati. In 1974, Bergey signed a three year "future contract" with Virginia of the World Football League that was to begin in 1976. His signing caused the NFL's first lawsuit against the WFL and the fallout led to the Bengals trading him to the Eagles. With the Eagles, Bergey earned four trips to the Pro Bowl, was named a 1st-team All-Pro by at least one major selector four times and was named the Eagles MVP three times. He helped the Eagles make the playoffs in each of his final three seasons, earning a trip to Super Bowl XV, his final NFL game. He had 233 tackles one year and once held the record for interceptions in a season by a linebacker with five. He is regarded as one of the best defensive players in team history by both the Bengals and Eagles.

Curley Culp*
Position: Defensive Tackle
Teams: Chiefs, Oilers, Lions 1968-81
Bio: Curley Culp was a college wrestling champion who utilized his great strength and quickness as one of the first modern era nose tackles and perhaps the greatest 3-4 tackle ever. The effectiveness of lining up directly over center was never more apparent than in his dominating performance in Super Bowl 4 when the Chiefs overpowered the Vikings. At the end of that 1969 season, Culp was named to play in the AFL All-Star Game. Culp continued as a standout in Kansas City but was traded to Houston in 1974 after he signed to play in the World Football League beginning in 1975. When the WFL folded, Culp remained in Houston and earned Pro Bowl and regular all-pro and all-AFC honors five straight years (1975-79) as the Oilers made it to two straight AFC Championship Games. Especially noteworthy was his 1975 season when he was a unanimous first team all-pro and NEA’s Defensive Player of the Year. In 2000, The Sporting News named Culp to both the Chief and Oiler all-century teams.

Kenny Easley
Position: Safety
Teams: Seattle Seahawks 1981-87
Bio: Kenny Easley made an immediate impact in Seattle in 1981 as the AFC Defensive Rookie of the Year. Two years later, he was named AFC Defensive Player of the Year as the Seahawks advanced to the AFC Championship Game in their first-ever playoff season. He was NFL Defensive Player of the Year and again led the Seahawks to the playoffs in 1984. Easley led the NFL with 10 interceptions that year including three in one game and followed up a week later with a pick-six, one of an incredible four Seattle INT touchdown returns in a 45-0 defensive manhandling of the Chiefs. Easley was a first team all-pro four times (1982-85) and was named to the NFL’s 1980’s all-decade team. The first of the injuries that curtailed his career occurred in 1986 and he retired in 1988 even though he was all-AFC and a Pro Bowler for the fifth time in 1987. Easley finished with 32 interceptions in seven seasons. He was inducted into the Seahawks Ring of Honor and was named to the Seahawks all-time team in 2010.

Lester Hayes
Position: Cornerback
Teams: Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders 1977-86
Bio: Lester Hayes was “the quintessential corner,” according to longtime NFL executive Ron Wolf. “He had size, speed, competitiveness, quickness, awareness and a burning desire to succeed. A gifted athlete. Strong. Loved to play the game.” Hayes’s ability to shut down top receivers one-on-one was a key to the Raiders defensive success during his ten-year career. One of his most noteworthy performances was in Super Bowl 18 when he and fellow corner Mike Haynes stifled Washington’s high-powered passing attack in a Raiders’ rout. The Raiders won two Super Bowls and finished with the best record in the AFC in two other seasons during Hayes’ career. He intercepted 18 passes in 1980 – 13 in the regular season (the second highest total in pro football history) and five in the postseason. He was a unanimous all-pro selection that year, a consensus choice in 1983 and was named to at least one all-pro team several other times. Hayes was named to five consecutive Pro Bowls after the 1980-84 seasons and his eight career postseason INTs are the second highest all-time total.

Jack Kemp
Position: Quarterback
Teams: Pittsburgh Steelers (1957); Los Angeles/San Diego Chargers (1960-62); Buffalo Bills (1962-69)
Bio: Until 1962, the Buffalo Bills were a ship without a sail. In their first three years in the American Football League, they had failed to make the playoffs.  That all changed after Jack Kemp was acquired during the '62 season. From 1963 through 1966, the strong-armed quarterback guided the Bills to four straight post-season appearances and two league titles, Buffalo’s only championships to date. He also quarterbacked the Chargers to back-to-back division titles in 1960-61. Kemp was a four-time all-AFL selection, appeared in seven AFL All-Star games, and was named the league's Most Valuable Player in 1965. He
was one of only twenty men who played in the AFL for its entire ten-year existence.  Kemp was also instrumental in forming the AFL Players' Association, and was elected the organization's president five times, where he gained valuable experience that served him well in his second career on the national political stage.

Eddie Meador
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Los Angeles Rams 1959-70
Bio: Widely unheralded during his collegiate career at tiny Arkansas Tech, defensive back Eddie Meador went on to appear in eight Pro Bowls and was a member of the NFL’s all-1960’s team. A 7th round draft pick, he was voted the Rams' Defensive Rookie of the Year. Meador was a force in the Rams secondary throughout his career and still holds team career records for interceptions (46), opponents fumbles recovered (18) and blocked kicks (10). Meador was voted the Rams "defensive back of the year" seven times and was named to the Rams All-Time team in both 1970 and 1985. The late Merlin Olsen, a long-time teammate, said Meador “was one of the finest defensive backs I have ever seen. Outstanding in coverage and a fierce tackler, he had a remarkable nose for the football that allowed him to come up with big plays again and again during his career.” Meador was awarded the Whizzer White Humanitarian Award and the NFL Father of the Year Award in 1969.

L.C. Greenwood
Position: Defensive End
Teams: Pittsburgh Steelers 1969-81
Bio: Drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the tenth round of the 1969 draft, L.C. Greenwood was one of the four members of the famous Steel Curtain defense of the 1970s (‘Mean’ Joe Greene, Ernie Holmes, and Dwight White). His height and quickness helped him block three of Fran Tarkenton’s passes in Super Bowl IX. Greenwood earned six trips to the Pro Bowl in his 13 years in the league. He was named to the All-Decade team of the 1970s and the Steelers won seven division titles (they were tied with Cincinnati for the 1973 division title, but was in second place due to tiebreakers) and four Super Bowl championships during his tenure. He was named to the Super Bowl Silver Anniversary team and the Pittsburgh Steelers’ All-Time team. According to records kept by the Pittsburgh Steelers, Greenwood retired with 73.5 sacks, good for second place behind Jason Gildon (77.0) and ahead of Greene (66.0). His best season was 1973 with eleven sacks. (These totals are unofficial). Greenwood also retired with 16 fumble recoveries, tied for fourth in Steeler’s history.

Ray Wietecha
Position: Center
Teams: New York Giants 1953-62
Bio: Ray Wietecha was in the middle of an excellent offensive line that included standouts Jack Stroud and all-time great Roosevelt Brown on many outstanding Giants teams. As center, Wietecha’s responsibilities included calling blocking assignments at the line of scrimmage and he took great pride in the cohesion of New York’s line. He was also well known around the NFL for being able to long-snap without looking. The prototype lunch-pail player, Wietecha never missed a game in his ten seasons as the Giants finished first five times and won one NFL championship. He was named to four Pro Bowls and earned consensus first team all-pro honors in 1958 as well as some second team honors in five other seasons. Though certain he likely could have played several more years, Wietecha retired after the 1962 season and embarked on a long second career as an assistant coach, the highlight of which was a stint with the Packers that included three consecutive championships in 1965-67. Wietecha passed away in 2002 at age 74.

Adolf "Swede" Youngstrom
Position: Guard
Teams: Buffalo All-Americans/Bisons (1920-25), Canton Bulldogs (1921), Cleveland Bulldogs (1925), Frankford Yellow jackets (1926-27)
Bio: Guard Adolf "Swede" Youngstrom was the anchor of the forward phalanx that cleared the way for the great Buffalo All-American/Bison teams that amassed an overall 34-15-7 record in the NFL’s first five seasons.  Along the way, the All-Americans twice finished within one game of the league title (1920 and '21).  Youngstrom was credited (unofficially) with blocking nine punts in 1920, and scored the game-winning touchdown after blocking Jim Thorpe's punt and recovering it in the end zone when the All-Americans defeated the Canton Bulldogs in the first pro game ever played in New York's Polo Grounds. 
Youngstrom was a three-time All-Pro (1923-25) and never missed a game in his six seasons in Buffalo. He also spent two seasons with the Frankford Yellow Jackets, winning a league title in 1926. He was, quite possibly, the best guard of his era, considering that the only guards in the Pro Football Hall of Fame who played during the 1920s - Mike Michalske and Walt Kiesling - actually played the majority of their careers in the 1930s.

 

Class of 2011
Ken Anderson
Position: Quarterback
Teams: Cincinnati Bengals 1971-86
Bio: Ken Anderson was one of the best quarterbacks of his era and one of the most accurate passers in pro football history. He was a four time passing champion, went to the Pro Bowl four times, and was the NFL Man of the Year in 1975. Anderson earned his biggest acclaim in 1981 when he was league MVP, Offensive Player of the Year, Comeback Player of the Year and a consensus first-team All-Pro. In 1982, he completed 20 passes in a row to set a new league record that stood until 2002, and also set the single season completion percentage record that would last until 2009. Anderson holds nearly every major Bengals regular season, post-season and career passing records, and his 16 seasons is the most in franchise history. In Anderson’s third season, just his second as a starter, he led Cincinnati to the 1975 AFC Central Division championship and a playoff berth. This was one of two division titles and four playoff appearances in his career. In 1981, Anderson led the Bengals to a franchise record 12 wins and an appearance in the AFC Championship Game. He threw two touchdowns in the 27-7 victory over San Diego in “The Freezer Bowl.” In Super Bowl XVI, Anderson rallied the Bengals from a 20-point deficit against San Francisco. Anderson’s two touchdown passes and one rushing touchdown were not enough in a 26-21 loss. Anderson was a finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1996 and 1998.

Cliff Branch
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams:
Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders 1972-1985
Bio: Cliff Branch is a three time Super Bowl champion. In 1974 he led the NFL in receiving yards, touchdown receptions and receiving yards per game. In 1976, he led the NFL in touchdown receptions, receiving yards per game as well as having the league's longest reception of the season, an 88 yard touchdown. He also averaged an amazing 24.2 yards per catch on the season. In 1983 he set the team record and tied the NFL record with a 99 yard touchdown reception. Branch went to four consecutive Pro Bowls (1974-1977) and was three times a consensus first team All-Pro (1974-76.) He spent his entire career with the Raiders and was a starter on all three of the franchises championship teams. In Super Bowl XV he had 5 catches for 69 yards and 2 touchdowns, while in Super Bowl XVIII he had 6 catches for 94 yards and a touchdown. He was a semi-finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2004 and 2010. 

Bobby Dillon
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1952-1959
Bio: Bobby Dillon earned four Pro Bowl selections in his eight seasons as a defensive back for the Green Bay Packers. Playing on mostly undermanned Packer teams, Dillon became the Packers’ all-time leader in interceptions with 52. He also owns the Green Bay record for the most seasons leading the team in interceptions (8). Three times in his career he intercepted nine passes, which ties him for second all-time with the Packers. Dillon is tied for the NFL record for most interceptions in a game (4). He is also tied for second most interception returns for touchdowns (5) in Packer history. In addition to his Pro Bowl honors, Dillon was a consensus first team All-Pro four times in a row (’55-’58). In three of those years he was a unanimous selection.

 

Cliff Harris
Positions: Free Safety
Teams: Dallas Cowboys 1970-1979
Bio: Cliff Harris was voted first-team safety on the NFL 1970's All-Decade team. He is the only first-team defensive player on that team to not be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He spent his entire career in the 70's, playing all ten seasons of his career for the same team that signed him after he went undrafted in 1970. He played in five Super Bowls with the Cowboys, winning two championships. During his exceptional career he intercepted 29 passes and had 18 fumble recoveries. He also had six career post-season interceptions. He was a three time consensus first-team All-Pro and was named to six consecutive Pro Bowls, from 1974 through his final season in 1979, ending his career still playing at a high level. He was a finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2004, and later that year he was inducted into the Cowboys Ring of Honor.

 

Harold Jackson
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams: Los Angeles Rams 1968, Philadelphia Eagles 1969-1972, Los Angeles Rams 1973-1977, New England Patriots 1978-1981, Minnesota Vikings 1982, Seattle Seahawks 1983
Bio: After playing only two games his rookie season, Jackson was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles. He promptly was selected to the Pro Bowl after racking up a league-leading 1,116 yards on 65 receptions in his sophomore season. He was traded back to the Rams in exchange for Roman Gabriel and scored a league-leading 13 touchdowns on his way to a consensus first-team all-pro selection in 1973. Jackson was in the top ten in receptions four times, the top ten in receiving yards five times and the top ten in receiving touchdowns four times. He led the league in receptions in 1972 (62); receiving yards in 1969 (1,116) and 1972 (1,048); receiving yards per game in 1969 (79.7) and 1972 (74.9); and receiving touchdowns in 1973 (13).

Andy Russell
Positions: Linebacker
Teams: Pittsburgh Steelers 1963-76
Bio: Andy Russell was part of what some consider the greatest linebacking corps in pro football history, playing alongside Hall of Famers Jack Ham and Jack Lambert. Russell made the NFL All-Rookie team in 1963 and was selected to seven Pro Bowls, including six in a row. He was a consensus first team all-AFC pick three times and got All-Pro mention in several seasons. He was the Steelers’ MVP in 1970 and won the Whizzer White Humanitarian Award in 1973. Throughout his football career, Russell displayed his durability by never missing a game. He also showed excellent leadership skills as captain of the Missouri team in 1962, as well as captain of the Steelers from 1967 through 1976. He was a key performer during the first half of the Steelers 1970’s dynasty and played on the Super Bowl champion teams of 1974 and 1975. He was inducted into the University of Missouri’s Hall of Fame in 1993.

Lou Saban
Position: Head Coach
Teams: Boston Patriots 1960-1961, Buffalo Bills 1962-1965, Denver Broncos 1967-1971, Buffalo Bills 1972-1976
Bio: Saban captained the Browns for Paul Brown for three of his four seasons as a linebacker/center. Cleveland won the AAFC title in all four of those seasons, posting a 47-4-3 record. Saban was an all-league choice in 1948 and ’49 and was named to the combined all-AAFC/NFL teams in both of those years as well. He coached the Bills to consecutive AFL titles in 1964-65, the only two championships in franchise history. Saban returned to Buffalo in the 1970s and led the Bills to the playoffs in 1974. His long, nomadic coaching career also included mostly unsuccessful stints with the Patriots and Broncos.

Tom Sestak
Position: Defensive Tackle
Teams: Buffalo Bills 1962-1968
Bio: Tom Sestak was a 17th-round pick in the 1962 AFL draft who went on to play seven seasons for Buffalo. Over that span, he recorded 51 sacks and returned two interceptions for touchdowns. He played in three AFL Championship Games, with his team winning two. Sestak was named to the All-AFL team four times and was selected to the Bills' Silver Anniversary Team in 1984. He was named to the all-time AFL team and to the Buffalo Bills Wall of Fame in 1987.

Jerry Smith
Position: Tight End
Teams: Washington Redskins 1965-1977
Bio: Jerry Smith’s career with the Washington Redskins has him fourth all-time in receptions (421) and sixth all-time in receiving yards (5,496) in team history. He made All-Pro twice (consensus once), all-conference twice and all-AFL/NFL once. At the time of his retirement, he was first among tight ends in career touchdowns (60), and currently ranks third. A key player in the Redskins' 1972 Super Bowl team, he was named as one of the 70 greatest Redskins by a blue-ribbon panel formed to celebrate Washington’s 70th anniversary.

 

Class of 2010
Robert Brazile
Position: Linebacker
Teams:
Houston Oilers 1975-1984
Bio:
Utilized great speed as dangerous outside linebacker. AP Defensive Rookie of the Year. Played in Pro Bowl in each of his first 7 seasons and never missed a game in 10-year career. Leading force on defense that propelled Oilers to two straight AFC title games.

Ed Budde
Position: Guard
Teams:
Kansas City Chiefs 1963-1976
Bio:
Played in two Super Bowls including win over Vikings in SB IV. Selected to five AFL All-Star games and two Pro Bowls. Chiefs led league in rushing yards three times and yards per carry twice during his career. Played in every game from 1963 to 1973.  

Don Coryell
Position: Head Coach
Teams:
St. Louis Cardinals 1972-1977, San Diego Chargers 1978-1986
Bio:
Innovator who introduced pass-heavy offense known as Air Coryell. Cardinals finished in 1st place in ’74 and ’75 after 26-year drought. Guided Chargers to first division titles in 14 years in ’79, ’80 and ’81. San Diego led NFL in passing yards six straight seasons.

Ox Emerson
Position:
Guard, Center, Linebacker
Teams:
Portsmouth Spartans 1931-1933, Detroit Lions 1934-1937, Brooklyn Dodgers 1938
Bio:
Two-way mainstay on Lions 1935 NFL champs. His blocking was big reason Detroit had NFL’s best ground game during his career. All-pro six straight years. Defensive standout in 1934 when Lions allowed only 59 points in 13 games and registered 7 straight shutouts.

Chuck Foreman
Position: Running Back
Teams:
Minnesota Vikings 1973-1979, New England Patriots 1980
Bio:
Consensus Rookie of the Year in 1973. Earned all-NFC honors in 1974, 1975 and 1976. NFC Player of the Year in ‘75 and NFC Offensive Player of the Year in ’76. Vikings made it to playoffs six times and to three Super Bowls in his seven years with team.

Bob Gain
Position:
Tackle, Middle Guard, End
Teams:
Cleveland Browns 1952, 1954-1964
Bio:
Standout defender at tackle, end and middle guard. Cleveland led NFL in many defensive categories in his 12 years. Earned five Pro Bowl berths and spot on many all-pro teams. Browns won two thirds of their games and three championships during his career.  

Riley Matheson
Position: Guard, Linebacker
Teams:
Cleveland Rams 1939-1942, Detroit Lions 1943, Cleveland Rams 1944-1945, Los Angeles Rams 1946-1947, San Francisco 49ers 1948
Bio:
Earned all-pro honors at both guard and linebacker in two leagues. His outstanding line play was one of keys to Rams’ 1945 NFL championship. Consensus all-pro 4 straight seasons in 1944-47. Joined the AAFC 49ers in 1948 and helped them to 12-2 record.

Jimmy Patton
Position: Defensive Back
Teams:
New York Giants 1955-1966
Bio:
Important cog on Giant defenses that led team to six conference titles. Had 52 career interceptions and led NFL with 11 in ’58. Consensus first team all-pro in five consecutive seasons including unanimous three times. Also named to Pro Bowl in those five seasons.

Drew Pearson
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams:
Dallas Cowboys 1973-1983
Bio:
Led the NFL in receiving yards in 1977. Cowboys played in three Super Bowls and made playoffs 10 times in his 11 seasons. Missed only 3 games in career that was cut short by serious car accident. Named to three Pro Bowls and was consensus 1st team all-pro twice.

Ken Riley
Position: Cornerback
Teams:
Cincinnati Bengals 1969-1983
Bio:
Nearly 30 years after his last game, still ranks fifth all-time with 65 career interceptions. Returned five of those 65 for touchdowns. Finished second in NFL in INT’s three times in his career with highs of 9 in ’76 and 8 in’83. Missed only eight games in 15 seasons.
 

 

Class of 2009
Bruno Banducci
Position: Guard
Teams: Philadelphia Eagles 1944-1945, San Francisco 49ers 1946-1954
Bio: Solid all-around blocker who earned first team all-pro honors twice in AAFC and three times in NFL. Also twice named to combined all-AAFC/NFL. Never played on champion but his teams won two-thirds of their games and finished second eight times. Seven times his team finished first in rushing yards and four times a teammate won rushing title.

Harold Carmichael
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams: Philadelphia Eagles 1971-1983, Dallas Cowboys 1984
Bio: Ranked fifth in career receptions, seventh in receiving yards and seventh in touchdown catches when he retired. Also held record with 127 straight games with a catch. Led NFL in receptions and yards in 1973 when he was first team all-pro. Third in yards in 1978 and fifth in catches in 1974. Unanimous all-NFC in 1978 and 1979.  

Blanton Collier
Position: Assistant Coach 1946-53 and 1962, and Head Coach 1963-70
Teams: Cleveland Browns
Bio: Had big impact as all-around assistant as Browns finished first in all eight seasons of his first tenure in Cleveland. Succeeded Paul Brown in 1963 after four playoff-less seasons and guided team to five first-place finishes and 1964 NFL championship. Browns won 69% of their games and never had a losing season in his eight years as head coach.

Boyd Dowler
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1959-1969, Washington Redskins 1971
Bio: Leading receiver on Green Bay’s dynasty of the 1960’s who twice was named all-conference. Finished in the top 10 in receptions three times despite playing for a very run-oriented team. Ranked 10th in catches and 12th in receiving yards all-time when he retired. Had huge postseason in 1967 when Packers won Ice Bowl and Super Bowl II.

Claude Humphrey*
Position: Defensive End
Teams: Atlanta Falcons 1968-1978, Philadelphia Eagles 1979-1981
Bio: Tall, powerful end who crushed pass pockets and destroyed running plays with great effectiveness. Garnered some first or second team all-pro honors eight times including three seasons where he was a consensus first-teamer. Joined Philadelphia after several serious injuries and helped Eagles to playoffs in each of his last three years.

Ken Kavanaugh
Position: End
Teams: Chicago Bears 1940-1941 and 1945-1950
Bio: Averaged 18.7 yards per catch or better every year he played and led NFL in 1941 at 28.5. Career average of 22.4 is one of best ever. Fifty of his 162 career catches were touchdowns and twice led league in TD receptions. Played in three title games (all Bear victories) and scored TD in all three. Missed three prime seasons to military service.   

Verne Lewellen
Position: Halfback
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1924-1927, New York Yankees 1927, Green Bay Packers 1928-1932
Bio: One of best backs of the 1920’s who twice led NFL in TD’s and rushing TD’s. Second team all-pro in 1925 and consensus first-teamer in 1926-29. Few statistics are available from that time but was an outstanding punter in era when advantage in that part of the game frequently meant victory. Packers won three titles in his years in Green Bay.

Walt Sweeney
Position: Guard
Teams: San Diego Chargers 1963-1973, Washington Redskins 1974-1975
Bio: Key component of San Diego’s high-octane offense of the 1960’s. Chargers ranked at top in numerous offensive categories in first part of his career and played in three straight title games, winning once. Named as second team all-league selection three times and first team four times including 1967-69 when he was consensus all-AFL.

 

Class of 2008
Dick Barwegen
Position: Guard
Teams: New York Yankees 1947, Baltimore Colts 1948-1949, Chicago Bears 1950-1952, Baltimore Colts 1953-1954
Bio: Outstanding guard for four teams in two leagues. Powerful run blocker whose teams were first in rushing yards twice and average gain once. Unanimous all-league choice four straight years. Excellent defender in his early years as two-way player.

Randy Gradishar
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Denver Broncos 1974-1983
Bio: Leader of Denver's Orange Crush defense that won the AFC in 1977. NFL Defensive Player of Year in '78. Never missed a game in 10 seasons. Broncos led NFL in numerous defensive categories in his prime years. 4 TD's and 20 INT's in career.

Bob Hoernschemeyer
Position: Halfback
Teams: Chicago Rockets 1946-1947, Brooklyn Dodgers 1947-1948, Chicago Hornets 1949, Detroit Lions 1950-1955
Bio: Among top rushers in each of his first 8 seasons. Led Detroit in rushing four straight years while Lions were winning two NFL titles.  Counting AAFC total, was 4th all-time in rushing when he retired.

Cecil Isbell
Position: Tailback
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1938-1942
Bio: Spectacular passer who led Packers to two Championship Games and one title. Set records for passing yards in 1941 and for completions, TD passes, and yards in '42. Also set marks with 5 TD throws in game and 22 straight games with TD pass.

Buddy Parker
Position: Head Coach
Teams: Chicago Cardinals 1949, Detroit Lions 1951-1956, Pittsburgh Steelers 1957-1964
Bio: Coached Detroit to three title games and two titles, compiling 50-24-2 record. Turned Pittsburgh into contender and ranks 3rd behind Noll and Cowher in wins among Steeler coaches. Also played 9 NFL years including on 1935 Lion title winners.

Spec Sanders
Position: Tailback
Teams: New York Yankees 1946-1948, New York Yanks 1950
Bio: Hard running tailback who established pro records with 1,432 rushing yards and 19 TD's in 1947 when he was AAFC MVP. Led Yankees to two AAFC title games. Set NFL record with 13 interceptions when he switched to defense full time in 1950.

Jim Ray Smith
Position: Guard
Teams: Cleveland Browns 1956-1962, Dallas Cowboys 1963-1964
Bio: One of fastest guards ever who earned all-pro honors in five of the six full seasons he played. Browns led NFL in rushing yards and yards per carry twice each in his years with team. Had memorable game in '59 when he dominated Gene Lipscomb.

Billy Wilson
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams: San Francisco 49ers 1951-1960
Bio: Thrice led NFL in receptions and was in top 7 seven straight years. 4th or better in receiving yards 5 times and also led league in TD catches once. Ranked 2nd all-time to Hutson in receptions and TD catches and 3rd in receiving yards when he retired.

 

Class of 2007
Frankie Albert
Position: Quarterback
Teams: San Francisco 49ers 1946-1952
Bio:
First team all-AAFC/NFL once, second team three times. All-AAFC three times. Tossed 29 TD's in 1948, 27 in '49. Co-MVP in 1948. Lost 4 years to military. Expert bootlegger,  ball-handler. 48.2 yard punting average in 1949, 43.0 for career. Great on-the-run punter.

Roger Brown
Position: Defensive Tackle
Teams: Detroit Lions 1960-1966, Los Angeles Rams 1967-1969
Bio:
Punishing tackle on great defenses in Detroit and Los Angeles. Starred in 1962 Thanksgiving Day Massacre. Once held all-time record with 3 career safeties. Iron man who never missed a game in 10 year career. 6 Pro Bowls, all-pro twice.

Timmy Brown
Position: Running Back
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1959, Philadelphia Eagles 1960-1967, Baltimore Colts 1968
Bio:
Dangerous runner, receiver, and return man. 12,681 all-purpose yards including 4th and 7th best season marks. 64 TD's, 6 on kick returns. Averaged 26.0 on kickoff returns and twice led NFL in yards. Led NFL with 5.4 rushing average in 1965. 3-time Pro Bowler.

Marshall Goldberg
Position: Back
Teams: Chicago Cardinals 1939-1943, 1946-1948
Bio:
Part of Cardinals' Dream Backfield. Leader on 1 league and 2 conference champs. Led NFL in interceptions in 1941. Twice led league in kickoff return yards and finished 3rd with 24.2 yard average in '41, 2nd at 26.2 in '42. Missed 2 years in military. All-pro in '47.

Jim Lee Howell
Position: End, Head Coach
Teams: New York Giants 1937-1942, 1946-1947, 1954-1960
Bio:
Winning percentage of .648 is best in Giants history of coaches with at least 3 seasons. Led team to 3 conference titles and 1956 championship. Never had a losing record in 7 years. Also won NFL title, 4 conference crowns, and all-pro honors as player.

Glenn Presnell
Position: Back
Teams: Portsmouth Spartans 1931-1933, Detroit Lions 1934-1936
Bio:
Outstanding triple threat. Led Ironton Yanks to wins over Giants and Bears in 1930. 1st in scoring, 2nd in passing, 4th in rushing and all-pro in '33. Played on Lions teams that had 7 straight shutouts in '34 and won NFL title in '35. Kicked record 54-yard field goal in '34. 

Dick Schafrath
Position: Tackle
Teams: Cleveland Browns 1959-1971
Bio:
Helped Browns finish 1st in rushing yards 5 times, yards per carry 6 times including all-time best 5.74 in1963. Known for making multiple blocks on same play. Only missed 2 games in 13 years. All-pro 3 times, 6 Pro Bowls. Team never had losing season in career.

Jake Scott
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Miami Dolphins 1970-1975, Washington Redskins 1976-1978
Bio:
Standout safety on two Super Bowl winners. 49 career interceptions. 2 in SB VII when he was MVP. In NFL Top 10 seven times. Known for playing hurt. Excellent kick returner. 5th in NFL in punt returns in 1970, 3rd in '71, 4th in '73. All-pro 4 times, 5 Pro Bowls. 

Ed Sprinkle
Position: Defensive End
Teams: Chicago Bears 1944-1955
Bio:
Rugged player on many excellent Bears' teams. One of the first pass rushing defensive ends. Played on Chicago's 1946 champions. Team finished 2nd 7 times in his career. All-pro twice, 2nd team 3 times, 4 Pro Bowls. Nabbed 7 TD passes in spot duty on offense.    

Tank Younger
Position: Halfback, Fullback
Teams: Los Angeles Rams 1949-1957, Pittsburgh Steelers 1958
Bio:
Mainstay on greatest offense in history. 6.2 yards per rush in 1951, 6.7 in '54, 4.7 for career. Pro Bowler and all-pro mention on both offense and defense. Played in 4 Championship Games. First pro player from historically black college. 

 

Class of 2006
Charley Conerly
Position: Quarterback
Teams: New York Giants 1948-1961
Bio:
The Giants' quarterback for 14 seasons, he led the team to an NFL championship in 1956 and was chosen Player of the Year in 1959 by both the AP and NEA.

John Hadl
Position: Quarterback
Teams: San Diego Chargers 1962-1972, Los Angeles Rams 1973-1974, Green Bay Packers 1974-1975, Houston Oilers 1976-1977
Bio:
Hadl quarterbacked the Chargers from 1962-72. He was All-NFL in 1973 with the Rams, was chosen to six Pro Bowls and AFL All-Star Games. He and Lance Alworth were one of the great pass-catch combinations of all time.

Chuck Howley
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Chicago Bears 1958-1959, Dallas Cowboys 1961-1973
Bio:
Still the only player to be named Super Bowl MVP while playing for the losing team, the Cowboys' great linebacker earned all-NFL honors six times and was a consensus choice three times.

Alex Karras
Position: Defensive Tackle
Teams: Detroit Lions 1958-1962, 1964-1970
Bio:
Before he became a TV star, Karras was one of the top defensive tackles in football. In 12 seasons with the Lions, he was picked to four Pro Bowls and named all-NFL four times.

Eugene Lipscomb
Position: Defensive Tackle
Teams: Los Angeles Rams 1953-1955, Baltimore Colts 1956-1960, Pittsburgh Steelers 1961-1962
Bio:
The Colts' D-line had Marchetti and Donovan, but "Big Daddy" was all-NFL in the title years 1958-59. Only his tragic death kept him from more legends.

Kyle Rote
Position: End, Halfback
Teams: New York Giants 1951-1961
Bio:
A great college halfback at SMU, injuries curtailed his pro career as a running back. Rote became the Giants' top receiver during the 1950s grabbing 300 passes.

Dick Stanfel
Position: Guard
Teams: Detroit Lions 1952-1955, Washington Redskins 1956-1958
Bio:
In only seven seasons with the Lions and Redskins, Stanfel was all-NFL five times and chosen to five Pro Bowls. He was named to the AII-1950s team by the Hall of Fame electors.

Otis Taylor
Position: Wide Receiver
Teams: Kansas City Chiefs 1965-1975
Bio:
Taylor's 46-yard TD reception wrapped up Super Bowl IV for Kansas City. Great combination with Len Dawson. Chosen for one AFL All-Star Game and two Pro Bowls.

Fuzzy Thurston
Position: Guard
Teams: Baltimore Colts 1958, Green Bay Packers 1959-1967
Bio:
With Jerry Kramer, Thurston pulled out of the line to lead the "Lombardi Sweep," the key to Green Bay's championship offense. Consensus All-NFL in 1961.

Deacon Dan Towler
Position: Fullback
Teams: Los Angeles Rams 1950-1955
Bio:
Led NFL in rushing in 1952 with 894 yards and a 5.7 average gain. Named to four Pro Bowls in only six seasons, all with L.A. Rams. Member of famed "Bull Elephant Backfield."

 

Class of 2005
Maxie Baughan
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Philadelphia Eagles 1960-1965, Los Angeles Rams 1966-1970, Washington Redskins 1974
Bio:
Star linebacker with Eagles from 1960-65, then captained George Allen’s complicated defense with Rams. Three times all-NFL; 9 Pro Bowls.  Aggressive and quick, but most valuable for his ability to diagnose opponents’ offenses.

Jim Benton
Position: End
Teams: Cleveland Rams 1938-1942, Chicago Bears 1943, Cleveland Rams 1944-1947
Bio:
Great receiver with the Rams from 1938 thru 1947.  Led NFL in receiving with 63 catches in 1946.  When he retired, his 288 catches ranked second all-time in NFL.  Sure hands and good speed, plus an unusually long reach.

Lavvie Dilweg
Position: End
Teams: Milwaukee Badgers 1926, Green Bay Packers 1927-1934
Bio:
Widely regarded as the best all-around end of the 1920s, he starred for Packers three championship teams of 1929-31.  Remarkably steady, he was a reliable receiver and deadly on defense. 

Pat Harder
Position: Fullback
Teams: Chicago Cardinals 1946-1950, Detroit Lions 1951-1953
Bio:
Fullback for the Cardinals’ “Dream Backfield” that powered the championship 1947 team.  Led NFL in scoring three times, 1947-49.  Excellent placekicker.  Helped Lions win titles in early 1950s with his running and kicking.

Floyd Little*
Position: Running Back
Teams: Denver Broncos 1967-1975
Bio:
Extremely popular running star for Denver from 1967-75, he led the AFC in rushing in 1970 and 1971.  His career marks included 6,323 rushing yards and 43 touchdowns.  Additionally a good receiver and outstanding kick returner.

Tommy Nobis
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Atlanta Falcons 1966-1976
Bio:
After a great career at Texas, Nobis was the first pick of the 1966 draft with expansion Atlanta.  He gave the Falcons 11 great years until his oft-injured knees gave out.  Chosen to 5 Pro Bowls, he was often compared favorably to Dick Butkus.

Pete Retzlaff
Position: Halfback, End
Teams: Philadelphia Eagles 1956-1966
Bio:
Sure-handed, a strong blocker and steady, Retzlaff could play flanker or tight end, starring for the Eagles from 1956-66.  He tied for NFL lead in most pass receptions in 1958.  Caught 452 for 16.4 average and 47 TDs in career.  Five Pro Bowls.

Tobin Rote
Position: Quarterback
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1950-1956, Detroit Lions 1957-1959, San Diego Chargers 1963-1964, Denver Broncos 1966
Bio:
Winning QB with 1957 NFL Lions champions and with 1963 San Diego AFL champs.  After seven years with weak Green Bay teams, his ‘57 trade to Detroit proved his ability to lead when he had the horses.  Passed for 18,880 career yards and 148 TDs.

Lou Rymkus
Position: Tackle
Teams: Washington Redskins 1943, Cleveland Browns 1946-1951
Bio:
After one season with Washington and two in the service, Lou joined the Browns in the AAFC and stayed through for five championships.  Paul Brown said he was the best tackle on the team in each of his six seasons.  Famous for playing hurt.

Del Shofner
Position: End
Teams: Los Angeles Rams 1957-1960, New York Giants 1961-1967
Bio:
Five-time all-pro, Shofner was first tried as a defensive back with the Rams but quickly switched to wideout where his speed and catching ability made him the NFL’s most feared deep threat.  Traded to the Giants, he excelled in combo with Y.A. Tittle.

 

Class of 2004
Gene Brito
Position: Defensive End
Teams: Washington Redskins 1951-1958, Los Angeles Rams 1959-1960
Bio:
Five-time Pro Bowl defensive end.  Played in 84 consecutiver games with Washington from 1951 thru 1958, with 1954 spent in Canada. Traded to Rams where he continued to star for two more seasons.

John Brodie
Position: Quarterback
Teams: San Francisco 49ers 1957-1973
Bio:
A talented passer for 17 seasons with a San Francisco teams that usually lacked the defense to match his offense.  Gained 31,548 yards passing.  Took 49ers to playoffs 3 times.

Jack Butler*
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Pittsburgh Steelers 1951-1959
Bio:
Steelers coaches always said he could have been an all-pro receiver but was too valuable to move from defense.  Intercepted 52 passes in 1951-59 career.  Four Pro Bowls.

Chris Hanburger*
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Washington Redskins 1965-1978
Bio:
Made up for lack of size with quickness and determination to play 14 outstanding seasons at linebacker for the Redskins.  Nine Pro Bowls. Named to Hall of Fame Team of the 1960s.

Bob Hayes*
Position: Split End, Wide Receiver
Teams: Dallas Cowboys 1965-1974, San Francisco 49ers 1975
Bio:
“World’s Fastest Human” who became great long-distance receiver with Cowboys (1965-75).  Caught 371 passes with 71 touchdown receptions over 11-seasons, ten with Dallas.  Averaged 20-yards per catch.

Billy Howton
Position: End
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1952-1958, Cleveland Browns 1959, Dallas Cowboys 1960-1963
Bio:
Two-time All-NFL, broke several of Don Hutson’s team records with Packers before finishing with Cleveland and Dallas (1952-63).   Caught 503 passes for 8,459 yards and 61 TDs. 

Jim Marshall
Position: Defensive End
Teams: Cleveland Browns 1960, Minnesota Vikings 1961-1979
Bio:
Rugged defensive end; part of famed “Purple People-Eater” Vikings defense that reached four Super Bowls.  Holds the NFL record with 282 consecutive games.

Al Nesser
Position: Guard
Teams: Akron Pros 1920-1925, Cleveland Bulldogs 1925, Akron Indians 1926, New York Giants 1926-1928, Cleveland Indians 1931
Bio:
An outstanding guard and end for two decades beginning in 1910.  One of 6 legendary football-playing brothers with Columbus; starred with Akron’s 1920 and the Giants’ 1927 champs.

Dave Robinson*
Position: Linebacker
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1963-1972, Washington Redskins 1973-1974
Bio:
Often overlooked among Packers’ stars (1963-72), consistently graded as top team linebacker.  Big enough to stop the run; fast enough to defend against passing.   Three Pro Bowls.

Duke Slater
Position: Tackle
Teams: Milwaukee Badgers 1922, Rock Island Independents 1922-1925, Chicago Cardinals 1926-1931
Bio:
Iowa All-America who became the leading black player of the 1920s; chosen all-pro several times in 10-year career (1922-31) despite playing for weak teams Rock Island and Chicago Cardinals teams.

 

Class of 2003
Gino Cappelletti
Position: End, Kicker
Teams: Boston Patriots 1960-1970
Bio:
Outstanding kicker / receiver for Boston Patriots 1960-70.  Ignored by NFL, AFL gave him a second chance.  He caught 290 passes.  His kicking and receiving accounted for 1130 points, including 155 in 1964.

Carl Eller*
Position: Defensive End
Teams: Minnesota Vikings 1964-1978, Seattle Seahawks 1979
Bio:
Five-time All-Pro defensive end with Minnesota 1964-78, Seattle 1979.  Played 225 games.  Bulwark of famed “Purple People Eater” defense.  Strong against run; fine pass rusher.  Helped Vikes to 10 NFL/NFC crowns.

Pat Fischer
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: St. Louis Cardinals 1961-1967, Washington Redskins 1968-1977
Bio:
Only 5’9” and 170 lbs, Fischer starred for 17 seasons (1961-77) with St. Louis and Washington.  He made 56 career interceptions in 213 games and was chosen to three Pro Bowls.

Benny Friedman*
Position: Tailback
Teams: Cleveland Bulldogs 1927, Detroit Wolverines 1928, New York Giants 1929-1931, Brooklyn Dodgers 1932-1934
Bio:
Friedman’s fame ranked second only to Grange during the 1920s.  Called the best defensive back ever seen, he really   wowed them with his running, kicking, and above all with his passing, the greatest of his day.

Gene Hickerson*
Position: Guard
Teams: Cleveland Browns 1958-1960, 1962-1973
Bio:
In 15 seasons with the Browns (1958-60, 1962-73), Gene’s  blocks cleared the way Jim Brown and Leroy Kelly.  His speed, power, durability, and athleticism made him a 6-time Pro Bowl selection.

Jerry Kramer
Position: Guard
Teams: Green Bay Packers 1958-1968
Bio:
A 5-time All-NFL choice with Lombardi’s Packers, Kramer’s most  famous block came on Starr’s sneak for the victory in the “Ice Bowl.”   He endured 22 operations during his career, but 5 championships made it worth it.

Johnny Robinson
Position: Defensive Back
Teams: Dallas Texans 1960-1962, Kansas City Chiefs 1963-1971
Bio:
Star safety with Dallas Texans / Kansas City Chiefs 1960-71.  Had 57 career interceptions. Began as offensive back, but soon moved to defense.  Sure tackler.  All-AFL  1965-69, All-AFC 1970.   2 Super Bowls.

Mac Speedie
Position: End
Teams: Cleveland Browns 1946-1952
Bio:
Cleveland Browns’ outstanding receiver 1946-52. Led AAFC in receptions 1947-49 and NFL in 1952.  Caught 349 passes for 5,602 yards and 33 touchdowns in only seven seasons. 

Mick Tingelhoff
Position: Center
Teams: Minnesota Vikings 1962-1978
Bio:
Minnesota Vikings’ center 1962-1978.  Extreme durability, set record for offensive linemen with 240 consecutive starts.  All-NFL/NFC 1964-70; 6 Pro Bowls, 4 Super Bowls.  Great quickness.

Al Wistert
Position: Tackle
Teams: Philadelphia Eagles 1943-1951
Bio:
Outstanding Philadelphia Eagles’ tackle 1943-51.  All-NFL 1944-48.  Quickness made up for lack of bulk at 217 pounds.  Strong on defense; really excelled as a blocker.  Led Eagles’ line  in NFL championship years 1948-49.

 

*Voted into the Professional Football Hall of Fame after induction into the Hall of Very Good.


 
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